Day Fourteen

October 14, 2008 at 7:24 pm 1 comment

The nursery quarters consisted of three rooms.  Each room was completely visible to the other.  The bottom part of the walls were like a cold dark January day, the top halves were windows.  The rooms were strictly functional.  Nothing in them celebrated the new lives they held. 

On the right was a room lined with four or five bassinets against one wall.  A diaper changing station occupied one corner.  A rocking chair where nurses sat to feed or soothe a newborn was in the other corner.  Each clear, plastic bassinet had a blue or pink card on the front with the name, weight and height of the child inside.  

The room on the far left held four elaborate warming beds, donned with bright yellow lights.  Two or three babies lay under screamingly bright lamps.  The penetrating light nursed them to healthy bilirubin levels, changing their carrot-like skin back to newborn pink.  The babies were spread eagle with little black tanning masks over their eyes.  They looked as if they were enjoying an Aruba vacation.  I half expected an exotic drink with an umbrella resting in a little hand.  I wanted to climb up with one of them, scoot him over and enjoy the warmth on my skin too.  I was jealous of these babies and their mothers.  If only a bright light could bring my daughter back to full health.

The middle room was for babies who were sick.  It was plain except for medical equipment. 

And there our child was, alone. 

The machines hooked up to her showed she was alive.  Her domed bed was adorned with wires and switches.    Oxygen and warmth pumped into her little plastic house.  She too had a pink card taped on the right side of her plastic house.

But the card did not have a name written on it.  The birth surprised us three weeks early.  We had yet to decide on a name.  After her birth my mental list of names did not fit her.  Though in many ways she resembled her sisters, honestly, I could not consider choosing a name.  I still felt like I was visiting someone else’s sick child. 

Life was happening around her but not in her.  While visiting I concentrated on her body to ensure that her chest moved up and down.  Her actions, if any, were slight.  She hardly ever opened her eyes.  Her lips were crusty and peeling.  Just under five pounds you could see her bones sticking out of her limp flakey flesh.  Her body was long.  She had big feet and a full head of golden brown hair.  I remember thinking that she looked like a grumpy old man at the end of his life, too weak to bother with the rest of us.  I was allowed to open the plastic window and lay my hand on her body or hold her hand for a couple of minutes here and there.  Her oxygen went low when the window was open.  I liked to hold onto her heel.

I stood by her incubator in small increments of time for the first three days. My incision ached and I became light headed often.  Every two hours a nurse would take a tiny tube connected to a bottle of formula that held a few ounces.  The nurse would place her hand on the back of the baby’s neck, lift her head a bit and when her lips parted the tube was placed inside her mouth and then pushed down her esophagus and into her stomach.  Instantly the liquid would disappear.  Every time it was very quick.  I asked the nurses to let me know when they were feeding.  Usually I did not find out in time. 

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Entry filed under: 31 for 21, Always, Culture differences, Former Soviet Union, Having a baby, Hospital stays, Kiev, Maxi pads, Mothering, NICU, Sickness, Ukraine.

Day Thirteen Day Fifteen

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Deborah  |  October 15, 2008 at 2:57 am

    I started reading your birth story a week ago and then forgot you were doing it! Just got all caught up again and added your blog to my blogroll so I can keep up to date.

    Thanks for writing about your experience, it is heartbreaking to read, but so moving! I remember when you first joined DownSyn, how worried you were about your future and your daughter. I’m glad to be able to read about your begining in such detail. You are a wonderful writer.

    Reply

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